Eye Contact
Posted on December 1, 2016

Eye Contact – How Important Is It?

There are a handful of techniques, tips, and tricks that can make anyone a more effective public speaker. A change in vocal tone and range can help. We all work at keeping those nerves under control. And let’s not forget, practice, practice, practice.

But there is one thing that a speaker can do to command the attention of their audience and improve their overall communication skills. Work on making more eye contact.

Eye contact benefits you as the speaker and has the power to transform the way your message is received by your audience.


Here are 4 benefits of eye contact and why it will improve your communication.

 

1. Your Confidence Can Soar

Make eye contact with members of the audience and you will familiarize yourself with the people in the room and also feel more confident.

2. You Ignite the Audience’s Desire to Listen

When people see your eyes scanning their faces they feel more encouraged to listen and will engage with the information you’re sending their way

3. You Slow Down

Fight nerves by looking at someone in the eye for three to five seconds. You will naturally start to slow down your speech. When you pause and make eye contact, you start to sound like a more controlled and effective speaker.

4. You Gain Credibility 

Make eye contact with your audience instead of focusing on the ground, the ceiling, the PowerPoint behind you, or even the prop in your hand. That way, you will begin to look authoritative and believable with the message you’re trying to present.


This information is from our Public Speaking curriculum. If you're looking for ways to improve your communication skills, register for one of our public classes.
Photo courtesy of Zolakoma

For more information about Eye Contact – Read these other great articles:

Fascinating Facts About Eye Contact – From Forbes.com

How to Make Eye Contact – From ImproveYourSocialSkills.com

Look People in The Eye (with Pictures) – From WikiHow.com

The Secrets of Eye Contact, Revealed – From PsychologyToday.com