Category: Grammar Rules

what if i use poor grammer will they hire me

Posted by & filed under Business Writing, Grammar Rules, Resume Writing.
Poor Grammer Mistakes

Breathe deeply. Relax. “Poor Grammer”?  This week’s headline was intentional. That’s a relief, right? We were sent an article that appeared in the Harvard Business Review. It was shared by an Improving Communications friend (and recipient of Defender of the Language award), Michael Rudegeair. Kyle Wiens, author of “I Won’t Hire People Who Use Poor Grammar. Here’s … Read On >

       

What Every Sentence Has: Subject and Verb

Posted by & filed under Business Writing, Grammar Rules.
subject and verb

SUBJECT and VERB AGREEMENT One of the basic aspects of sentence structure is ensuring proper agreement between the subject and verb. A singular subject uses a singular verb; a plural subject uses a plural verb. Singular:        Loretta works here.                             [Loretta, the subject, and works, the verb, are singular.] Plural:            The siblings work here.                             … Read On >

       

Pluralizing Last Names

Posted by & filed under Business Writing, Grammar Rules.

Do you know the correct methods for Pluralizing Last Names?   Making the plural form of a proper name  can be challenge without this information. Use it to be spot-on, and be able to handle someone else’s name with the greatest of respect (by getting its plural form correct!). Last letter(s) of last name What … Read On >

       

Noise or Noises – Which Is Correct Grammar?

Posted by & filed under Business Writing, Grammar Rules, Public Speaking.

Recently, at a barbeque, two friends were having a disagreement about who had the correct grammar. They came to me to settle the argument (knowing what I do, and because I’m a grammar geek). Here’s what happened: The first one had been holding her phone in her hand, waiting to receive a message. To her … Read On >

       

Run-On Sentences & Fragments

Posted by & filed under Business Writing, Grammar Rules.
run-on sentences

Mistakes in your writing can cost you dearly.  Recently I heard one of my clients say that when she gets a resume containing errors, it goes immediately in the “unacceptable” pile. Make sure your writing is correct by addressing the completeness of your sentences. Run-on sentences contain two or more independent thoughts not separated by any … Read On >

       

Writing In Complete (or Incomplete) Sentences

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Writing Complete Sentences

Fragments and Run-Ons and Errors – Oh My! Writing In Complete–or Incomplete Sentences? To be sure any one sentence you write is correct and complete, ask yourself, “Is it understandable out of context?” (In other words, if you stated only the sentence out loud to someone, would it make sense? If it does, then it’s … Read On >

       

p[roofreading youre werk to mske sure thyre arent andy misakes

Posted by & filed under Business Writing, Grammar Rules.
proofreading

The term, “FAIL” has become widely used as an Internet meme where people superimpose the word, “FAIL” on images of the unsuccessful, or that which does not live up to what is expected. Usually, these FAILs are intended to make people laugh. In most cases, they are quite funny. Written messages in customer-serving businesses, like … Read On >

       

Everyone IS / Everyone ARE

Posted by & filed under Business Writing, Grammar Rules.

Indefinite Pronouns Indefinite pronouns replace nouns without specifying which noun they replace These are words that begin with any-, every-, no-, or some-and end with -body, -one, or -thing. Indefinite pronouns that end in -body, -one, or –thing, are singular. In your mind, add the word, “single” in the middle of these words to reinforce … Read On >

       

Who or Whom?

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Who or Whom

The subject is who or what the sentence is about.  The trip to the office usually takes about an hour. The predicate is what the subject is or does. The trip to the office usually takes about an hour. “Who” is the subject case and “whom” is the object case. Examples: Who is going with … Read On >